A Scientific Spectrum

ask away, but B. cereus!    person(s) are interested in science!

wildcat2030:

Supersize me: The breeding of domesticated plants and animals has changed some populations by as much as 30 standard deviations. Broiler chickens, for example, have increased in size more than four times since 1957. A similar approach could be applied to human intelligence, leading to IQs greater than 1,000.

wildcat2030:

Supersize me: The breeding of domesticated plants and animals has changed some populations by as much as 30 standard deviations. Broiler chickens, for example, have increased in size more than four times since 1957. A similar approach could be applied to human intelligence, leading to IQs greater than 1,000.

— 1 day ago with 159 notes

nubbsgalore:

autumn from above by kacper kowalski in kashubia, poland 

(via sad-eyedprophet)

— 1 day ago with 5835 notes
bpod-mrc:

17 October 2014
Human Shield
Drinkers who are more resilient to alcohol intoxication can thank the enzyme encoded in a gene called ALDH2. And the same enzyme also limits the damage done by heart attacks and allows victims to recover faster. By studying heart muscle fibres (shown in green) produced in the laboratory from stem cells taken from donated skin samples, biologists discovered that the gene protects heart tissue during oxygen deprivation. When the supply of blood is cut off to a part of the heart, healthy muscle cell nuclei (shown in blue) begin to die (red). But almost eight people out of every one hundred, predominantly of east Asian origin, carry a dysfunctional version of the gene that leaves them unprotected and more prone to heart disease. Biochemists now want to compare how cardiac patients from different ethnic groups respond to different drugs in order to tailor their treatment to their needs.
Written by Tristan Farrow
—
Image by Joseph C. Wu and colleaguesStanford University, USACopyright held by AAAS Science MagResearch published in Science Translational Magazine, September 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

17 October 2014

Human Shield

Drinkers who are more resilient to alcohol intoxication can thank the enzyme encoded in a gene called ALDH2. And the same enzyme also limits the damage done by heart attacks and allows victims to recover faster. By studying heart muscle fibres (shown in green) produced in the laboratory from stem cells taken from donated skin samples, biologists discovered that the gene protects heart tissue during oxygen deprivation. When the supply of blood is cut off to a part of the heart, healthy muscle cell nuclei (shown in blue) begin to die (red). But almost eight people out of every one hundred, predominantly of east Asian origin, carry a dysfunctional version of the gene that leaves them unprotected and more prone to heart disease. Biochemists now want to compare how cardiac patients from different ethnic groups respond to different drugs in order to tailor their treatment to their needs.

Written by Tristan Farrow

Image by Joseph C. Wu and colleagues
Stanford University, USA
Copyright held by AAAS Science Mag
Research published in Science Translational Magazine, September 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

— 3 days ago with 34 notes
mindblowingscience:

Cancer Detection Inspired by the Deadly Mantis Shrimp

The incredible compound eyes of the mantis shrimp can see a great number of things we can only dream of, and apparently that includes cancer. A team of researchers from Australia are suggesting that not only can mantis shrimp see a variety of cancerous tissues in the human body, but technology can be adapted to emulate this remarkable ability.
Justin Marshall, from the Queensland Brain Institute at the University of Queensland, was involved in some recent remarkable research that closely examined the capabilities of a mantis shrimp’s “superbly tuned” compound eyes.
"We see color with hues and shades, and objects that contrast - a red apple in a green tree for example - but our research is revealing a number of animals that use polarized light to detect and discriminate between objects," he explained in a statement.
According to Marshall, his team found that in place of some tactile sensations, mantis shrimp can see the differences in surfaces and even tissues, noticing characteristics that humans wouldn’t be able to detect until breaking out tools and science.
Even cancerous tissue, which normally is only identified with biopsy, apparently reflects polarized light differently than healthy tissue, meaning that it’s very visible to the vibrantly colored shrimp.
And that’s because (in a very basic explanation) mantis shrimp can see a whopping 16 base colors. By comparison, the color-receptive cones in human eyes can see only three base colors - blue, red, and green - from which every other color we see is derived.
If the vibrant rainbow humans see is based off a mere three types of cones, imagine what the world would look like with SIXTEEN of them! Suddenly seeing cancer doesn’t seem like much of a surprise for the mantis shrimp.
Cancer Cam
But now so can we. According to a study recently published in the journal Proceedings of the IEEE, Marshall and his colleagues identified key components in mantis shrimp eyes that allow them to filter polarized light. They mimicked these components, called micro-villi, using aluminum nanowires and placed them on top of photodiodes, which convert light into electrical current.
But even after this process is complete, researchers still won’t be able to see the unimaginable color spectrum that the shrimp see for themselves. Instead, they will just be able to see interrupted images indicating important differences in how polarized light reflects.
"It converts the invisible messages into colors that our visual system is comfortable with," Marshall explained.
Interestingly, this isn’t the first time polarized light detection will be used in cancer identification. Current imaging systems use the same basic concept, but without the refined technologies inspired by the ocean’s most incredible shrimp. They lack accuracy and require relatively large equipment, thereby limiting how such systems can be used.
By replicating the eyes of mantis shrimp, the scientists hope to improve upon existing technology to the point that it could even be incorporated into a smartphone, creating a Star Trek-like reality in which simply passing a handheld device over a person’s body can detect the presence of a potentially life-threatening condition.
Inspiring War Machines, Too
Interestingly, if you were ever to meet a mantis shrimp for yourself, don’t believe for a second that it would be some enlightened guru of the aquatic world just because it sees more beautiful colors than we do.
Popular internet cartoonist and nature-lover The Oatmeal once called the mantis shrimp an “undersea nightmare, and one of the most creatively violent animals on Earth.”
The shrimp boasts two “fists” that fold much like the claws of a praying mantis (hence the name). Observations of this remarkable creature have shown that using these appendages, the shrimp can throw punches with 1,500 newtons of force - so strong that they cause tiny undersea shockwaves that kill prey even if the “fist” doesn’t make contact.
And because of this incredible predation strategy, the fists themselves have to be incredibly tough to withstand the full force of impact. In fact, research is currently being funded by the US Air Force to investigate the makeup of these super tough fists, in the hopes of one day replicating the material to craft light-but resilient aircraft and even body armor.

mindblowingscience:

Cancer Detection Inspired by the Deadly Mantis Shrimp

The incredible compound eyes of the mantis shrimp can see a great number of things we can only dream of, and apparently that includes cancer. A team of researchers from Australia are suggesting that not only can mantis shrimp see a variety of cancerous tissues in the human body, but technology can be adapted to emulate this remarkable ability.

Justin Marshall, from the Queensland Brain Institute at the University of Queensland, was involved in some recent remarkable research that closely examined the capabilities of a mantis shrimp’s “superbly tuned” compound eyes.

"We see color with hues and shades, and objects that contrast - a red apple in a green tree for example - but our research is revealing a number of animals that use polarized light to detect and discriminate between objects," he explained in a statement.

According to Marshall, his team found that in place of some tactile sensations, mantis shrimp can see the differences in surfaces and even tissues, noticing characteristics that humans wouldn’t be able to detect until breaking out tools and science.

Even cancerous tissue, which normally is only identified with biopsy, apparently reflects polarized light differently than healthy tissue, meaning that it’s very visible to the vibrantly colored shrimp.

And that’s because (in a very basic explanation) mantis shrimp can see a whopping 16 base colors. By comparison, the color-receptive cones in human eyes can see only three base colors - blue, red, and green - from which every other color we see is derived.

If the vibrant rainbow humans see is based off a mere three types of cones, imagine what the world would look like with SIXTEEN of them! Suddenly seeing cancer doesn’t seem like much of a surprise for the mantis shrimp.

Cancer Cam

But now so can we. According to a study recently published in the journal Proceedings of the IEEE, Marshall and his colleagues identified key components in mantis shrimp eyes that allow them to filter polarized light. They mimicked these components, called micro-villi, using aluminum nanowires and placed them on top of photodiodes, which convert light into electrical current.

But even after this process is complete, researchers still won’t be able to see the unimaginable color spectrum that the shrimp see for themselves. Instead, they will just be able to see interrupted images indicating important differences in how polarized light reflects.

"It converts the invisible messages into colors that our visual system is comfortable with," Marshall explained.

Interestingly, this isn’t the first time polarized light detection will be used in cancer identification. Current imaging systems use the same basic concept, but without the refined technologies inspired by the ocean’s most incredible shrimp. They lack accuracy and require relatively large equipment, thereby limiting how such systems can be used.

By replicating the eyes of mantis shrimp, the scientists hope to improve upon existing technology to the point that it could even be incorporated into a smartphone, creating a Star Trek-like reality in which simply passing a handheld device over a person’s body can detect the presence of a potentially life-threatening condition.

Inspiring War Machines, Too

Interestingly, if you were ever to meet a mantis shrimp for yourself, don’t believe for a second that it would be some enlightened guru of the aquatic world just because it sees more beautiful colors than we do.

Popular internet cartoonist and nature-lover The Oatmeal once called the mantis shrimp an “undersea nightmare, and one of the most creatively violent animals on Earth.”

The shrimp boasts two “fists” that fold much like the claws of a praying mantis (hence the name). Observations of this remarkable creature have shown that using these appendages, the shrimp can throw punches with 1,500 newtons of force - so strong that they cause tiny undersea shockwaves that kill prey even if the “fist” doesn’t make contact.

And because of this incredible predation strategy, the fists themselves have to be incredibly tough to withstand the full force of impact. In fact, research is currently being funded by the US Air Force to investigate the makeup of these super tough fists, in the hopes of one day replicating the material to craft light-but resilient aircraft and even body armor.

(via starsaremymuse)

— 1 week ago with 191 notes
compoundchem:

This year’s Longitude Prize is focused on the growing problem of antibiotic resistant bacteria. They’ve put together a nice image, shown here, which showcases what they term ‘the ten most dangerous antibiotic resistant bacteria’. You can read more detail on each of them here:http://www.nesta.org.uk/news/antibiotic-resistant-bacteriaThe prize offers a £10 million prize fund for the development of a cheap, accurate, and easy to use bacterial infection test kit, which will allow doctors to prescribe the correct antibiotics at the correct time for patients, to try to help minimise the development of antibiotic resistance.

compoundchem:

This year’s Longitude Prize is focused on the growing problem of antibiotic resistant bacteria. They’ve put together a nice image, shown here, which showcases what they term ‘the ten most dangerous antibiotic resistant bacteria’. You can read more detail on each of them here:http://www.nesta.org.uk/news/antibiotic-resistant-bacteria

The prize offers a £10 million prize fund for the development of a cheap, accurate, and easy to use bacterial infection test kit, which will allow doctors to prescribe the correct antibiotics at the correct time for patients, to try to help minimise the development of antibiotic resistance.

(via freshphotons)

— 1 week ago with 2791 notes
ifelten:

Rank koralsvamp (Ramaria stricta)
Strict-branch coral

ifelten:

Rank koralsvamp (Ramaria stricta)

Strict-branch coral

(via mycology)

— 1 week ago with 98 notes
fotojournalismus:

The moon is seen glowing red during a total lunar eclipse from Kathmandu, Nepal on October 8, 2014. (Narendra Shrestha/EPA)

fotojournalismus:

The moon is seen glowing red during a total lunar eclipse from Kathmandu, Nepal on October 8, 2014. (Narendra Shrestha/EPA)

— 1 week ago with 339 notes