A Scientific Spectrum

ask away, but B. cereus!    person(s) are interested in science!

theolduvaigorge:

Academics Write Papers Arguing Over How Many People Read (And Cite) Their Papers

Studies about reading studies go back more than two decades

(via eternalacademic)

— 2 hours ago with 31 notes

odditiesoflife:

The Butterfly of the Sea

This is fish is called the Sea Robin, otherwise known as a Gurnard or The Butterfly of the Sea. This interesting fish is a bottom dweller. They have several sets of specialized fins, including some that allow the fish to swim and others that let it perch on the seafloor. It’s not related to flying fish, nor do they glide in air. The Sea Robin’s large pectoral fins are normally held against the body, but are spread out when threatened to put off predators.

source 1, 2, 3

(via ichthyologist)

— 6 hours ago with 13602 notes
biomedicalephemera:

unnaturalist:

There once was an Ichthyosaurus,Who lived when the earth was all porous,Be he fainted with shameWhen he first heard his name,And departed a long time before us.
biomedicalephemera:

Animaux perdus [“Lost Animals” - colloquial term for extinct creatures]
*kercrunch*
Dictionnaire Pittoresque d’Histoire Naturelle et des Phenomenes de la Nature. F. E. Guerin, 1833.


I forgot this post.
*kercrunch*

biomedicalephemera:

unnaturalist:

There once was an Ichthyosaurus,
Who lived when the earth was all porous,
Be he fainted with shame
When he first heard his name,
And departed a long time before us.

biomedicalephemera:

Animaux perdus [“Lost Animals” - colloquial term for extinct creatures]

*kercrunch*

Dictionnaire Pittoresque d’Histoire Naturelle et des Phenomenes de la Nature. F. E. Guerin, 1833.

I forgot this post.

*kercrunch*

(via numantinecitizen)

— 8 hours ago with 646 notes
red-lipstick:

Nasa - W49B, the highly distorted supernova remnant shown in this image, may contain the most recent black hole formed in the Milky Way galaxy. If I think about this for too long I’ll have a panic attack.

red-lipstick:

Nasa - W49B, the highly distorted supernova remnant shown in this image, may contain the most recent black hole formed in the Milky Way galaxy. If I think about this for too long I’ll have a panic attack.

(Source: nasa.gov, via starsaremymuse)

— 8 hours ago with 1007 notes

sagansense:

Regarding the recent NASA Kepler discovery of what is being dubbed the closest “Earth-like” or “Earth twin” planet…

"This planet Kepler-186f orbits a star that’s cooler and dimmer than the sun. So while we may have found a planet that’s the same size as Earth, and receives the same amount of energy to what Earth receives, it orbits a very different star. So, perhaps, instead of an Earth twin, we have discovered an Earth cousin," said NASA Ames Research Scientist Thomas Barclay, of BAERI.

imageStanding on the surface of Kepler-186f, this is how the view may appear. Credit: Danielle Futselaar

Not to downplay this hype, however. There’s no mistaking it…THIS IS A MAJOR MOMENT IN HUMAN HISTORY.

Astronomers have discovered planets that reside in the Goldilocks or Habitable Zone of solar systems outside of our own. This, however, is the first confirmed find of a planet as close in size (10% larger) to that of Earth.

image"This is the best case for a habitable planet yet found. The results are absolutely rock solid. The planet itself may not be [rocky], but I’d bet my house on it. In any case, it’s a gem," Geoff Marcy, Astronomer at the University of California Berkeley told Space.com.

imageimageimageimageKepler-186f’s potential for liquid water and perhaps, life, is what make its existence that much more intriguing. [view larger]

"Some people call these habitable planets, which of course we have no idea if they are, we simply know that they are in the habitable zone, and that is the best place to start looking for habitable planets," San Francisco State University astronomer and study co-author Stephen Kane said in a statement to Space.com.

image"The four companion planets — Kepler-186b, Kepler-186c, Kepler-186d and Kepler-186e — whiz around their sun every four, seven, 13 and 22 days, respectively, making them too hot for life as we know it. These four inner planets all measure less than 1.5 times the size of Earth," noted in an official statement from NASA.

Geoff Marcy said, "This planet is modestly illuminated by its host star, a red dwarf. This planet basks in an orange-red glow from that star, much [like what] we enjoy at sunset."

image
Kepler-186f is 1 of 5 planets around its host star, which is a red dwarf, taking 130 days to orbit. As seen in the comparison-worthy artistic rendering above, Kepler-186f and our Earth would share similar views at dawn and dusk.

image
Whether or not Kepler-186f does contain life, one thing is for certain, there’s a whole lot more space to explore. If Carl were here to share in these continued findings, I believe he’d revert to a self-quoted suggestion from his novel-turned-motion-picture, Contact

“The universe is a pretty big place. If it’s just us, seems like an awful waste of space.”

Stay curious. This is just the beginning.

— 9 hours ago with 208 notes

stories-yet-to-be-written:

our-strange-yet-beautiful-planet:

Arnensee Lake, Switzerland 

The waters of Arnensee in Switzerland are so clear they cause boats such as the one in the picture to appear as they are hovering in the air. 

The lake is located in Canton of Berne in Switzerland, and can be easily reached with a little planning. Although that first picture has made the lake relatively known, it’s still usually a quiet, tourist-free place.

(via ab-incunabulis)

— 10 hours ago with 64821 notes
Scientists discover the animal kingdom’s first ‘female penis’ →

(Source: agapinbeing)

— 10 hours ago with 9 notes
steepravine:

Colorful Log Eaters
(Marin, California - 4/2014)

steepravine:

Colorful Log Eaters

(Marin, California - 4/2014)

(via mycology)

— 11 hours ago with 346 notes
ratak-monodosico:

Los Alamos scientist sitting next to the worlds first atomic bomb shortly before the Trinity test. July 16, 1945

ratak-monodosico:

Los Alamos scientist sitting next to the worlds first atomic bomb shortly before the Trinity test. July 16, 1945

(Source: historicaltimes, via androphilia)

— 12 hours ago with 537 notes